Lots to do in Livingston

livingston

“New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music” had a fabulous opening last Tuesday at the University of West Alabama in Livingston! Ted Whisenhunt, a musician as well as an artist, performed with the Kudzu String Band. Children danced to the music and everyone enjoyed the festivity. The Smithsonian exhibition looks great in the galleries in the historic administrative building.

Two more exhibitions, “Heroes, Hymns, Hard Times and Good Times: The Roots of Traditional Music in Alabama,” created by Whisenhunt and writer Fred Fussell, and “Ruby Pickens Tartt: An Alabama Original,” are also available for viewing.

Ruby Pickens Tartt, from Livingston, dedicated her entire life to recording and preserving African-American folklore and folk songs. Alan Brown, AHF Road Scholar, “New Harmonies” scholar and UWA English professor, created the Tartt exhibition and wrote a book on the folklorist. Books on Alabama traditional music are on display.

Ruby Pickens Tartt, from Livingston, dedicated her entire life to recording and preserving African-American folklore and folk songs.

Mark your calendars:

  • May 28 at 6:30 p.m.: Alabama Humanities Foundation Road Scholar and “New Harmonies” scholar Joyce Cauthen will talk about “Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Strawbeaters: Alabama’s First Pop Musicians” at the Callaway Schoolhouse
  • June 19-20 at 8:30 a.m.: “Strung Together: Dulcimers and Their Impact on Alabama Music,” a dulcimer workshop led by Jannice Poole at Land Hall (for children grades 3-5)
  • June 23 at 6:30 p.m.: “Your Roots Are Showing: Personal Stories about Folksingers from Sumter County,” by Nan Graham at the Callaway Schoolhouse

For more detailed calendar information concerning “New Harmonies” in Livingston, please call the Center for the Study of the Black Belt at (205) 652-3828 or e-mail vburnes@uwa.edu.

Congratulations to everyone at the Center for the Study of the Black Belt for the exhibitions and great programs!

Written by: Susan P.