Events

2015

May 19-June 26: “The Way We Worked” Museum on Main Street Exhibition

Dothan, AL
Troy University Dothan Campus Library
R. Terry Everett Hall

May 21: Architreats: Food for Thought Lunchtime Lecture Series

Makers of Sacred Harp, by David Warren Steel
Montgomery, AL
Click here for more information

May 29: Young Professionals Board “Humanitini”

6-8 p.m. Desert Island Supply Co, Birmingham
Join the Alabama Humanities Foundation Young Professionals Board for an evening of networking, mingling, and exploring the AHF SUPER Teacher Program.

June 1-4, 2015: SUPER Institute: Language, Culture, and Landscape of Peru

University of Montevallo Language Immersion Institute
Lead Scholar: Leonor Vazquez Gonzalez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish at University of Montevallo

June 2: Young Professionals Board Meeting

6-8 p.m. AHF Office
More information, contact Dionne Clark (dclark@alabamahumanities.org)

June 15-18: SUPER Institute: American Slave Narratives: Their Impact on Fiction and Film

The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
Lead Scholar: Alan Brown, Ph.D., Professor of Languages and Literature at the University of West Alabama

June 18: Architreats: Food for Thought Lunchtime Lecture Series

Goats & Governors: Alabama Political Stories by Steve Flowers
Montgomery, AL
Click here for more information

OLDER EVENTS

2014

October 2014

Monday, October 6: AHF Annual Awards Luncheon
Alabama Power Company President and CEO Mark Crosswhite will deliver the keynote address at the annual awards luncheon of Alabama Humanities Foundation at The Club atop Red Mountain.The luncheon begins at 11:30 a.m. and will include honoring the winners of the Jenice Riley Memorial Scholarship for excellence in teaching, Alabama Humanities Award for Betty McMahon, Wayne Greenhaw Service Award for Dr. Jack Hawkins and Charitable   Organization to the Humanities for AAA Cooper.

September 2014

September 4: Applications are due for the 2014 Jenice Riley Memorial Scholarship
Scholarships is available to kindergarten – sixth-grade educators who wish to further their professional development.
[Click here to apply]

September 4: Screening of Ken Burns’ The Roosevelts: An Intimate History
Join AHF and Alabama Public Television for a viewing of Ken Burns’ The Roosevelts: An Intimate History. The screenings are Thursday, September 4, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm at Pebble Hill, Auburn University and Alabama School of Fine Arts in Birmingham. Free and open to the public, the two pre-broadcast screenings include 40-minutes each of clips drawn from the 14-hour series. Historians Wayne Flynt (Auburn screening) and Rebecca Woodham (Birmingham screening) will offer historical commentary about the Roosevelt influence on Alabama.

September 29: Last day to RSVP for the Annual Awards Luncheon

August 2014

August 13: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Straw Beaters sponsored by the Pell City Public Library
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Pell City Public Library
1923 1st Ave N, Pell City, AL 35125
Time: 12:00 p.m.

August 21: Architreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives & History
“The Treaty of Fort Jackson” by Kathryn Braund
[Click here for more information]

August 26: Rojo Night
Join AHF’s Young Professionals Board at Rojo Night on Tuesday, Aug. 26 from 5 to 10 pm. Rojo, a Latin American Restaurant, is located on 2921 Highland Ave. S, Birmingham, Alabama 35205. Rojo is donating 10% of the night’s proceeds to Alabama Humanities Foundation. Don’t forget to ask for an AHF ticket before placing your order. A large ticket count will generate more revenue for AHF.
[Click here for more information]

July 2014

July 7: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
YWCA Central Alabama – Woodlawn
100 59th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 949-5550
[Click here for more information]

July 8 – Battle of Mobile Bay
One-day SUPER Teacher Workshop
History Museum of Mobile
Lead Scholar: Dr. Lonnie Burnett, Professor of History at University of Mobile
Institutional Partners: History Museum of Mobile & University of Mobile
This one-day workshop will engage teachers in the history and commemoration of the Battle of Mobile Bay. Educators will receive resources and implementation strategies to integrate this vital piece of Alabama history into their social science curriculum.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.
[Click here for more information]

July 10 – The History, Literature and Music of WWI
One-day SUPER Teacher Workshop
History Museum of Mobile
Lead Scholar: Marty Olliff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History & Archivist at Troy University Dothan Campus
Institutional Partners: Alabama Department of Archives and History, Troy University & History Museum of Mobile
This one-day workshop is designed to introduce teachers to the history and literature of World War I. The lead scholar and lead educator will present the same information, but each workshop will host a different guest scholar whose topics include Alabama doughboys of the 167th Regiment, the war on the Eastern Front, the African American experience on the home front and American literature from the war. Each workshop will provide teachers with historical and cultural resources, curriculum integration strategies and techniques, digital media resources, and valuable literature to share with their students across the disciplines.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.
[Click here for more information]

July 14: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
YWCA Central Alabama – Woodlawn
100 59th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 949-5550
[Click here for more information]

July 14-17 – Mockingbird Moments: To Kill a Mockingbird (Novel and Film) in Harper Lee’s Hometown, Monroeville, Alabama
4-day SUPER Teacher Residential Institute
Location: Monroeville, AL
Lead Scholar: Nancy Grisham Anderson, Associate Professor of English at Auburn University at Montgomery
Institution Partners: Monroe County Museum, AL Southern Community College, Auburn University at Montgomery
Harper Lee has described To Kill a Mockingbird as a “love story” of small-town life, a way of life now rapidly disappearing in our country. “Mockingbird Moments” provides teachers the opportunity to experience small-town life in the author’s hometown, Monroeville, Alabama. In the town that inspired the successful novel and subsequent movie, they will discuss the novel as literature, study the history of the 1930s and the 1960s, visit the museum and archives devoted to the novel and the town of its origin, meet residents who shared early years with the author, watch the film in the courtroom recreated in the film, and listen to music inspired by the novel. Teachers will gain a more in-depth understanding of the novel and film and their significance in our culture through their studies and their immersion in small-town life.
Residential institute; housing and meals provided. CEUs provided.
[Click here for more information]

July 17: Architreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives & History
“Civil War Mobile” by Lonnie Burnett
[Click here for more information]

July 19: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Straw Beaters sponsored by the Dothan Houston County Library System
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Houston-Love Memorial Library
445 North Oates Street
Time: 2:00 p.m.

July 20: Please Pass the Folklore: Family and Community Traditions in the Kitchen and Around the Dinner Table sponsored by Dothan Landmarks Foundation, Inc.
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Administrative Building, Landmark Park
430 Landmark Drive, Dothan, AL 36303
Time: 3:00 p.m.

July 21: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
YWCA Central Alabama – Woodlawn
100 59th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 949-5550
[Click here for more information]

July 26: Every Picture Tells a Story: The Storytelling of Norman Rockwell sponsored by The Pell City Center
Presented by: Delores Hydock
Location: Pell City Center Theatre
120 Williamson Drive,  Pell City, AL 35125
Time: 7:00 p.m.

July 26: At Home Between Earth and Sky: Voices from Chandler Mountain sponsored by Coosa County Historical Society
Presented by: Delores Hydock
Location: Kellyton Community Center
 2775 N Central Ave, Kellyton, AL
Time: 2:00 p.m.

July 28-31 – Social Movements in Latin America: Exclusion, Popular Protests, and Democratization
4-day SUPER Teacher Residential Institute
Location: University of Montevallo
Language Immersion Institute – Spanish
Lead Scholar: Leonor Vazquez-Gonzalez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish at University of Montevallo
Institutional Partners: University of Montevallo
Social and substantive citizenship in Latin America has traditionally been a highly exclusionary status; this situation has worsened as a result of the negative dimensions of current globalization, in particular, economic crises, political corruption and transnational organized crime. However, from a positive vantage point, globalization has opened novel political spaces in which patterns of relations between state and civil society are glimpsed. This institute examines a series of contemporary social movements in Latin America whose common denominator is the attempt to break down old and new systems of domination in order to create a more inclusionary and empowered society. Participants will explore the origins, ideas, successes and failures of a variety of popular movements such as urban, labor, indigenous, gender and environmental movements.
Residential institute; housing and meals provided. CEUs provided.
[Click here for more information]

July 29 – Team-Based & Collaborative Learning in Digital Environments for the Humanities
One-day SUPER Teacher Workshop
Location: University of Alabama at Birmingham
Lead Scholar: Rosie O’Beirne, Director of Digital Media & Learning at UAB
Institutional Partners: UAB College of Arts and Sciences and UAB Digital Media
This workshop will engage teachers across the humanities by providing teachers with a number of resources and techniques that will allow them to integrate multimedia and digital technologies with student learning and instruction. Teachers will collaborate in a state of the art media classroom, equipped with Apple products that are loaded with the latest media applications and collaborative learning stations.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.
[Click here for more information]

June 2014

June 16: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
YWCA Central Alabama – Woodlawn
100 59th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 949-5550
[Click here for more information]

June 19: Paris’ New Cultural Spaces: French Immersion Workshop
One-day SUPER Teacher Workshop
University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB)
Lead Scholar: Dr. Catherine Danielou, Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, UAB College of Arts & Sciences
Institutional Partners: UAB College of Arts & Sciences
This workshop will examine how new Parisian cultural spaces such as the Musée du Quai Branly and the Galliera Musée de la Mode, repurposed districts, new parks, newly created espaces jeunes, new public institutions, and recent bridges such as Pont Charles-de-Gaulle and Passerelle Simone-de-Beauvoir have redefined and restructured the city of Paris. The workshop will feature literary readings and a discussion on the role of cultural spaces in Paris. It will integrate digital resources and media, language-immersion instruction, and resources that can be used in the classroom. Full immersion in French.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.
[Click here for more information]

June 19: Architreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives & History
“A BlessedWork in a Somber World: Selections from the Hank Williams Reader by Steve Goodson
[Click here for more information]

June 23: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
YWCA Central Alabama – Woodlawn
100 59th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 949-5550
[Click here for more information]

June 23-26 – American Slave Narratives: Their Impact on Fiction and Film
4-day SUPER Teacher Residential Institute
The University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa)
Lead Scholar: Alan Brown, Ph.D., Professor of Languages and Literature at University of West Alabama
Institution Partners: The University of Alabama and University of West Alabama
Slave narratives are one of the most riveting types of autobiographical writing ever produced in America. They range from the published slave narratives penned in the century by writers like Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs to the less formal 19th slave narratives collected in the American South by the W.P.A. between 1936 and 1938. Although their validity has been questioned by historians for years, they put a face on slavery, thereby making these stories meaningful for today’s students. The twentieth century produced a number of novels and films that constitute fictional accounts of the slave experience in America. “American Slave Narratives” will study the autobiographical form of the American slave narrative, and trace the evolution in American history to the narrative form in the American novel and the American cinema.
Residential institute; housing and meals provided. CEUs provided.
[Click here for more information]

June 30: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
YWCA Central Alabama – Woodlawn
100 59th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 949-5550
[Click here for more information]

May 2014

May 1: Every Picture Tells a Story: The Storytelling of Norman Rockwell 
12:00 p.m.
Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts
217 E. Tuscaloosa St. Florence, AL 35630
Road Scholars Speakers Bureau: Speaker Dolores Hydock

May 5: At Home Between Earth and Sky: Voices from Chandler Mountain sponsored by the Arlington Historical Association
2:00 p.m.
Arlington Museum House, Garden Room 
Road Scholars Speakers Bureau: Speaker Dolores Hydock

May 6: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Birmingham Public Library – Woodlawn Branch
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
[Click here for more information]

May 8: Mothers’ Day 1961: Freedom Rides in Alabama
5:30 p.m.
Decatur Public Library
http://www.decatur.lib.al.us/
Road Scholars Speakers Bureau: Speaker Laura Anderson

May 13: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Birmingham Public Library – Woodlawn Branch
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
[Click here for more information]

May 15: Architreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives & History
“Now A Single Shot Can Do It” Lee vs. Macon and School Desgregation in Alabama by Joseph Bagley
[Click here for more information]

May 16: Applications are due for the 2014 SUPER Teacher Program
[Click here to apply]

May 20: At Home Between Earth and Sky: Voices from Chandler Mountain sponsored by the Arab Historical Society
6:30 p.m.
Rich Church in Arab Historic Village
Road Scholars Speakers Bureau: Speaker Dolores Hydock

April 2014

April 8: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Birmingham Public Library – Woodlawn Branch
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
[Click here for more information]

April 11: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Mobile Public Library – Parkway Branch
1924-B Dauphin Island Parkway
Mobile, AL
251-470-7766
[Click here for more information]

April 15: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Birmingham Public Library – Woodlawn Branch
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
[Click here for more information]

April 22: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Birmingham Public Library – Woodlawn Branch
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
[Click here for more information]

April 28: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Birmingham Public Library – Woodlawn Branch
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
[Click here for more information]

March 2014

March 3: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Florence-Lauderdale Public Library
350 N Wood Ave.
Florence, AL 35630
(256) 764-6564
Click here for more information

March 6: Through the Back Door: The Music that Bridged the Bayou 
Presented by: Dolores Hydock
Location: Bessemer Public Library
Time: 10:00 a.m.
For more information, contact Dianne Clark at dclark@bham.lib.al.us

March 10: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Florence-Lauderdale Public Library
350 N Wood Ave.
Florence, AL 35630
(256) 764-6564
[Click here for more information]

March 11: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Mobile Public Library – Parkway Branch
1924-B Dauphin Island Parkway
Mobile, AL
251-470-7766
[Click here for more information]

March 19: At Home Between Earth and Sky
Presented by: Dolores Hydock
Location: First Presbyterian Church in Birmingham
Time: 6:00 p.m.
For more information, contact Sherri Nielson at snielson2008@gmail.com

March 18: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Mobile Public Library – Parkway Branch
1924-B Dauphin Island Parkway
Mobile, AL
251-470-7766
[Click here for more information]

March 20: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Straw Beaters
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: 1636 Glenn Cove, Vestavia, AL
Time: 10:00 a.m.
For more information, contact Naden Siniard at (205) 822-7829

March 25: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Mobile Public Library – Parkway Branch
1924-B Dauphin Island Parkway
Mobile, AL
251-470-7766
[Click here for more information]

February 2014

February 10: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Florence-Lauderdale Public Library
350 N Wood Ave.
Florence, AL 35630
(256) 764-6564
[Click here for more information]

Saturday, February 15, 2014 : Alabama Voices
The Museum of Alabama’s new centerpiece exhibition, Alabama Voices,
will officially open to the public. The public Grand Opening on February 15 will feature a wide variety of activities for the entire family. The official ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held at 9:30am on the front terrace of the Alabama Department of Archives and History. From 9am to 5pm, visitors can tour the new exhibition, enjoy food, art, and performances by Alabama musical groups on the Archives’ front lawn, listen to fascinating presentations by contributors to the exhibition, participate in fun activities for families and children, and more. Musical groups to perform include the Birmingham Sunlights, Flying Jenny, Bay City Brass Band, and Mariachi Garibaldi, among others.
[Click here for more information]

February 17: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Florence-Lauderdale Public Library
350 N Wood Ave.
Florence, AL 35630
(256) 764-6564
[Click here for more information]

February 18: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Mobile Public Library – Parkway Branch
1924-B Dauphin Island Parkway
Mobile, AL
251-470-7766
[Click here for more information]

February 18: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Straw Beaters
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Athens State College
Free and open to the public

February 21: Writing a Local, Personal of Family History
Presented by: Robert Davis
Location: Odenville Public Library
Time: 10:00 a.m.
Free and open to the public.

February 24: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Florence-Lauderdale Public Library
350 N Wood Ave.
Florence, AL 35630
(256) 764-6564
[Click here for more information]

February 24: The Evolution of the Miracle Worker sponsored by Horizons Unlimited
Presented by: Dr. Alan Brown
Location: Alexander City Board of Education Office (375 Lee Street, Alexander City)
Time: 1:30 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

February 25: Prime Time Family Reading Time
5:30 p.m.
Mobile Public Library – Parkway Branch
1924-B Dauphin Island Parkway
Mobile, AL
251-470-7766
[Click here for more information]

February 28: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Straw Beaters
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Lafayette Public Library (198 1st St SE, La Fayette, AL 36862)
Time: 12:00 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

January 2014

January 11: Putting Down New Roots: An Immigrant Family’s Journey sponsored by Mobile Genealogical Society
Presented by: Dolores Hydock
Location: Holy Family Catholic Church, Vitale Room (1400 Joyce Rd, Mobile, Alabama 36618)
Time: 10:30 a.m.
Free and open to the public.

January 23: Literary Treason: Writings of Beth Streeter Aldrich sponsored by Savantes Literary Club
Presented by: Dolores Hydock
Location: 1613 Sunnywood Circle, Birmingham
Time: 11:00 a.m.
For more information, contact Ginger Sharbel at 205-822-4832

January 24: Community Traditions in the Kitchen and Around the Table sponsored by Andalusia Public Library
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Andalusia Public Library
Time: 12:00 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

2013

December 2013

November 2 – December 25: The Way We Worked
The Smithsonian traveling exhibit The Way We Worked will focus on how Alabamians worked over time and place and highlight the work experiences of Americans as part of the nation’s story. Visitors will follow workers into their workplaces through films of various industries. Interactive components will introduce visitors to the experiences of multiple generations of families involved in the same work.
Location: Ashland
Grant Program
Free and open to the public.

December 1: At Home Between the Earth and Sky: Voices of Chandler sponsored by the Ashland City Library
Presented by: Dolores Hydock
Location: On the square in downtown Ashland
Time: 2 p.m.
Free and open to the public.

December 19: Alabama’s Got the Boll Weevil Blues by James C. Giesen
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history. At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]
Free and open to the public.

November 2013

November 2 – December 25: The Way We Worked
The Smithsonian traveling exhibit The Way We Worked will focus on how Alabamians worked over time and place and highlight the work experiences of Americans as part of the nation’s story. Visitors will follow workers into their workplaces through films of various industries. Interactive components will introduce visitors to the experiences of multiple generations of families involved in the same work.
Location: Ashland
Grant Program
Free and open to the public.

November 6: Furniture for Food, sponsored by the Huntsville Antiquarian Society
Presented by: Christopher Lang
Location: The home of Patsy Haws (call the number below for the address)
Time: 10 a.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 256-539-3852
[Click here for more information]

November 7-9: National Federation of State Humanities Councils’ annual conference
AHF will host the National Federation of State Humanities Councils’ annual conference in Birmingham. This event will bring 56 councils, more than 400 participants, to Birmingham.
[click here for more information]

November 7: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Strawbeaters, sponsored by Fayette Music Study Club
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: First United Methodist Church
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Info: Call 205-932-6530
[Click here for more information]

November 7: Please Pass the Folklore: Family and Community Traditions in the Kitchen and Around the Dinner Table
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Irondale Public Library
Time: 6 p.m.
Info: Call 205-951-1415
[Click here for more information]

November 11: Please Pass the Folklore: Family and Community Traditions in the Kitchen and Around the Dinner Table
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: The Club in Birmingham
Time: 11 a.m.
Info: Call 205-822-0541
[Click here for more information]

November 17: Journey Proud will air on Alabama Public Television
Episode 103: Camp Fasola, 6 p.m. and 10 p.m.
Episode 104: BBQ Clubs, 6:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

November 21: Diamonds in the Rough: A History of Alabama’s Cahaba Coal Field by James S. Day 
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history. At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]
Free and open to the public.

November 21: Journey Proud will air on Alabama Public Television
Episode 103: Camp Fasola, 9 p.m.
Episode 104: BBQ Clubs, 9:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

October 2013

Sept. 17 – Oct. 22: Prime Time Family Reading Time®
Location: Woodlawn Public Library
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 595-2001
*Every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

Sept. 17 – Oct. 22: Prime Time Family Reading Time®
Location: Woodlawn Public Library
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 595-2001
*Every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

Monday, Oct. 7: AHF Annual Luncheon
Location: The Club in Birmingham
Time: 12:00 p.m.
The Alabama Humanities Foundation welcomes multi-instrumentalist and composer Bobby Horton as the Alabama Humanities Award honoree for its 2013 Annual Luncheon. Winston Groom, best-selling author of Forrest Gump, Shiloh 1862, and Vicksburg 1863 will be the featured speaker. AHF will also award Don Noble with the Wayne Greenhaw Service Award and Books-A-Million with the Charitable Organization Award.
[Click here for more information]

October 8: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Strawbeaters: Alabama’s First Pop Musicians
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Birmingham Public Library – Springville Road Branch, 1224 Springville Road
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 205-226-3742
[Click here for more information]

October 17: Alabama and the War of 1812 by Jeanne & David Heidler
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history. At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]
Free and open to the public.

October 17: Furniture for Food
Presented by: Christopher Lang
Location: Kennedy-Douglass Center for the Arts, 217 E. Tuscaloosa Street, Florence
Time: noon
Info: Call 256-760-6381
[Click here for more information]

October 20: Journey Proud will air on Alabama Public Television
Episode 101: Gourd Houses, 6 p.m. and 10 p.m.
Episode 102: Decoration Day, 6:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

October 24: Journey Proud will air on Alabama Public Television
Episode 101: Gourd Houses, 9 p.m.
Episode 102: Decoration Day, 9:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

October 29: Project C: Lessons from the American Civil Rights Movement webcast
Part I of III, 10:30 am and 12:30 am
[click here for more information]

October 31: School Spirits: Ghost Stories from Alabama’s College Campuses
Presented by: Dr. Alan Brown
Location: White Smith Memorial Library, 213 College Ave, Jackson
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 251-246-4962
[Click here for more information]

September 2013

Sept. 9 – Oct. 14: Prime Time Family Reading Time®
Location: Florence-Lauderdale Public Library
350 N Wood Ave.
Florence, AL 35630
(256) 764-6564
*Every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

September 11: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Strawbeaters—Alabama’s First Pop Musicians
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: First Presbyterian Church
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 205-603-2474
[Click here for more information]

September 12: The Passion of Miss Augusta – Reception & Film Screening
Location: Ben May Main Library in Mobile
Time: 6:00 p.m. (Reception will be at 6 p.m. in the Armbrecht/Briskman Meeting Room. Film screening will be in Bernheim Hall at 6:30 p.m.)
Admission: Free
Info: Call 205-208-7097
Please join Alabama filmmaker, Robert Clem (Eugene Walter: Last of the Bohemians, William March’s Company K) and Susan Reynolds, Ph.D., Victorian scholar and associate editor for Alabama Heritage magazine for the premiere screening of The Passion of Miss Augusta. The one hour film directed by Mr. Clem combines the life of legendary Mobile author Augusta Evans Wilson with dramatized scenes from her most famous novel, St Elmo (1866). The film is co-sponsored by Foundation for New Media and the Mobile Public Library. Funding was provided by the A.S. Mitchell Foundation, Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Ben May Charitable Trust, C.D. Helen and Jeff Glaze Foundation, The Daniel Foundation, J.L. Bedsole Foundation, Monte Moorer Foundation, Erie Hall Meyer Charitable Fund, Inc, and Hearin Chandler Foundation.

September 14 – October 25: The Way We Worked
The Smithsonian traveling exhibit The Way We Worked will focus on how Alabamians worked over time and place and highlight the work experiences of Americans as part of the nation’s story. Visitors will follow workers into their workplaces through films of various industries. Interactive components will introduce visitors to the experiences of multiple generations of families involved in the same work.
Location: Red Bay
Grant Program
Free and open to the public.

Sept. 17 – Oct. 22: Prime Time Family Reading Time®
Location: Woodlawn Public Library
5709 1st Avenue North
Birmingham, AL 35212
(205) 595-2001
*Every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.
[Click here for more information]

September 18: Famous Lost Words: Recording and Preserving Oral History
Presented by: Maurice Gandy
Location: Selma Public Library
Time: 4 p.m.
Info: Call 334-875-1286
[Click here for more information]

September 19: While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Remembers by Carolyn M. McKinstry
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history. At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]
Free and open to the public.

September 26: Talking about Tallulah
Presented by: Frances Robb
Location: Savantes Literary Club, Birmingham (call the number below for more information)
Time: 12:00 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 256-822-6955
[Click here for more information]

September 30: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Strawbeaters—Alabama’s First Pop Musicians
Presented by: Joyce Cauthen
Location: Alexander City Board of Education Office, 375 Lee Street
Time: 1:30 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 256-234-9922
[Click here for more information]

August 2013

August 15: White Paths, Red Paths: Fort Mims and the Alabama Frontier by Greg Waselkov
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history. At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]
Free and open to the public.

August 21: Writing a Local, Personal or Family History
Presented by: Robert Davis
Location: Pell City Public Library, 1923 1st Ave North, Pell City
Time: 12:00 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 256-338-6461
[Click here for more information]

August 23-24: Public symposium commemorating the 50th anniversary of the integration of Tuskegee High School
Location: The Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural Center
The symposium will feature several of the students who integrated Tuskegee High School on Sept. 2, 1963. In addition, Fred Gray, Esq., who filed and argued the case that eventually integrated all public schools in Alabama, will reflect on the case and its aftermath, including the extraordinary measures of Gov. George Wallace to block integration. Peggy Wallace Kennedy, daughter of Gov. George Wallace, will speak at a luncheon on Sat., Aug. 24, at noon at the historic Tuskegee High School gymnasium. The symposium officially begins with a reception at 6 p.m. on Fri., Aug. 23, with a screening of the documentary “Tuskegee, Alabama: Living Black and White” at 3:30 p.m. prior to the reception. Saturday sessions include discussions by notable scholars, writers and guests, including Wayne Flynt, Mab Segrest, David Mathews, Robert Norrell, Mike Letcher, Doug Segrest, Tony Haygood, Rhonda Collier and Janice Ward Parrish. The sessions are free to the public, but registration is requested due to space limitations. A $20 registration fee is required to attend the Friday evening reception at the Tuskegee Multicultural Center and the Saturday luncheon at the historic Tuskegee High School gymnasium.

All participants must register by Aug. 17. For the schedule, registration, directions and additional information, visit www.auburn.edu/maconcountyeducation or call (334) 844-6198.
[Click here for more information]

August 27: Injustice Remembered
Injustice Remembered is a unique, community-based event that will be hosted by The Evergreen Center for Dialogue and Discernment, Troy University Dothan, The Alabama HumanitiesFoundation, Alfred Saliba Memorial Fund – Evergreen Presbyterian Church U.S.A, and the Dothan-Houston County Library System. The event will include a panel and audience discussion surrounding the issues raised in the book and subsequent film Slavery By Another Name. The evening discussion will be facilitated by Chris McCauley with the Dave Mathews Center for Civic Life. Robert Lupton author of Toxic Charity, Dr. Amy Chasteen Miller from the University of Southern Mississippi, Dr. Wayne Flynt, professor emeritus from Auburn University, and Tonya Groomes (descendant of the main character of the book) will participate on the panel. The audience members will be invited to interact also and to reason together about what it could mean for us to work together on addressing some of these issues.
Site: Troy University Dothan Campus in Sony Hall at 6:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]
Free and open to the public.

August 29: Antique Alabama Furniture
Presented by: Christopher Lang
Location: Columbiana Public Library
Time: 4 p.m.
Info: Call 205-669-5812
[Click here for more information]

July 2013

July 18: Cars Fell on Alabama: The Automotive Industry Comes to Alabama
Led by Bill Taylor
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history.
At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]
Free and open to the public.

July 21-25: The African-American Experience and the South: Themes in Race, Culture, Politics, and Identity
Led by: Larry McLemore, Ph.D. and David C. Carter, Ph.D., Auburn University
Site: Spring Hill College in Mobile
SUPER Teacher Program
[Read more about this institute]
Registration is closed.

June 2013

June 20, 2013: The History, Culture, and Literature of Normandy
Led by: Catherine Danielou, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham
Location: Birmingham
Co-Sponsored by University of Alabama at Birmingham
SUPER Teacher Program
[Read more about this institute]
Registration is closed.

June 20: The Emancipation Proclamation in Wartime Alabama, 1863
Led by: John Kvach
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history.
At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]

[Click here to view an article about the lecture]

June 23-26: Mocking Bird Moments: A Study of the Novel and Film
Led by: Nancy Grisham Anderson, Auburn University Montgomery
Location: Monroeville
Co-Sponsored by Auburn University at Montgomery, Alabama Southern Community College, and the Monroe County Museum
SUPER Teacher Program
[Read more about this institute]
Registration is closed.

June 26: Whetstone/Seaman Symposium
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Location: The University of Alabama’s Ferguson Ballroom, Room 231
The symposium will also serve as an opportunity for public deliberation on the topic, “Shaping Our Future: How Should Higher Education Help Us Create the Society We Want?” Deliberation will be guided using an issue book developed by the National Issues Forums Institute. Nath is professor of Philosophy at The University of Alabama and will be a speaker at the symposium along with Chris McCauley, executive director of the David Mathews Center and Mark Wilson, director of Civic Learning Initiatives, College of Liberal Arts, Auburn University.
[Click here to read more about this event
Free and open to the public.

May 2013

May 4: BEFORE “MOCKINGBIRD”: THE CAMPUS JOURNALISM OF HARPER LEE

Place: The Old Courthouse Museum at Monroeville
Time: 2 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call the Museum at 251.575.7433

For a matinee before the Gala evening performance of “To Kill a Mockingbird” in Monroeville on Saturday, May 4, the Alabama Readers Theatre including Harper Lee Award winning novelist Billy Cobb (“A Walk Through Fire”) and Don Noble of APT’s “Bookmark” presents Harper Lee’s witty one-act play from her student writings in the University of Alabama’s campus newspaper “The Rammer Jammer.” It is entitled “Now Is The Time for All Good Men,” a satirical send-up of literacy tests at the voting booth and the bigoted politicians who supported them. They are joined by poet Jennifer Horne and writer Loretta Cobb (“The Ocean was Salt”) who comment on other newly revealed writings of Harper Lee during her days as a college journalist. Presented in conjunction with the Alabama Center for the Book. Click here for more info.

May 10: Applications are due for SUPER Teacher Institutes and the SUPER Emerging Scholars program.

May 16: “THE BICYCLE THIEF”: A SPECIAL SHOWING TO HONOR ARTHUR MAYER OF DEMOPOLIS
Place: The Marengo Theater in Demopolis, Alabama
Time: 7 p.m.
Admission: $5.00 per person
Info: Call the Library at 334.289.1595

Born in Demopolis in 1886 and the son of a founder of Mayer Brothers Department Store, Arthur Mayer worked for motion picture tycoons Samuel Goldwyn and Adolph Zukor before World War II. At the end of the War, Mayer was stationed in Italy where he was introduced to Italian cinema. He became a pioneer importer of foreign movies to America including the landmark “The Bicycle Thief” which won the Best Foreign Film Oscar in 1949. The film is still listed by critics as one of the greatest ever made. The Demopolis Public Library and the Two Rivers Arts Council partner to present a special presentation of the film as a feature of Trailfest 2013. Click here for more info.

May 16: Longleaf Pine: The Tree That Made Alabama
Led by: Bill Finch
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history.
At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]

May 17: WORKING FOR GOLDWYN: DEMOPOLIS DESCENDS ON HOLLYWOOD

Place: The Marengo Co. History and Archives Museum, 101 North Walnut Ave., Demopolis, Alabama
Time: 6 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 334.289.0599

Two Demopolis descendants worked for Hollywood tycoon Sam Goldwyn: Arthur Mayer and Lillian Hellman. Both wrote memoirs of their unpredictable and hilarious experiences with the mogul. Hellman was a screenwriter for Goldwyn; Mayer was a copywriter of ads for his films. Hellman’s theatrical and cinematic work earned Oscar and Tony nominations. Mayer was honored with a special luncheon by the Museum of Modern Art in New York City on his 85th birthday in 1971 for importing foreign film classics into the United States.

During this event to celebrate Jewish History Month, Dr. Stuart Rockoff of the Goldring/Waldenburg Institute of Southern Jewish Life talks about the successes of Southern Jews in Hollywood. An Oscar nominated short documentary from the 1970s about Arthur Mayer and his wife Lillie, entitled “Arthur and Lillie,” concludes the program. A champagne reception follows the film. Local partners are the Marengo County Historical Society and the Marengo County History and Archives Museum. Click here for more info.

April 2013

April 13 – 14: THE MARENGO COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY PILGRIMAGE

Place: Originates at Bluff Hall, 407 N. Commissioners Ave., Demopolis, Alabama
Time: Saturday, April 13th from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, April 14th from 2 to 5 p.m.
Admission: Tickets available at the event
Info: Call 334-289-0282

Happily Trailfest coincides with a pilgrimage of homes and vintage sites hosted every second year by the Marengo County Historical Society. The Society operates two museums in Demopolis, the ante-bellum Lyon Hall and Bluff Hall. The mansions will be featured on the tour route in addition to architectural treasures rarely opened to the public. Demopolis and its diverse history have influenced generations of writers, historians and visitors. Click here for more info.

April 13: THE MARENGO COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S VINE AND OLIVE WINE FESTIVAL AND ART SHOW

Place: The Coplin Building, 201 West Washington Street, Demopolis, Alabama
Time: 4 to 8 p.m.
Admission: Tickets available at the event
Info: Call 334.289.0282 or view poster

Demopolis was founded in 1817 by French immigrants – exiled followers of the deposed Napoleon – with a goal to transform their plot of American soil into a Vine and Olive Colony for wine production. Grapes and olive trees refused to grow in the chalky Tombigbee soil, but the city’s French founders left a storied legacy that inspired a 1937 novel, “Some Plant Olive Trees” by Emma Gelders Sterne, and a Hollywood script by George Waggner for a John Wayne movie in 1947: “The Fighting Kentuckian.” The French legacy continues with the Historical Society’s annual Wine Festival and Art Show during its pilgrimage weekend. Click here for more info.

April 14: AT TABLE WITH LILLIAN AND TENNESSE

Place: Lyon Hall on South Main in Demopolis, Alabama
Time: 3 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 334-289-0282

Esteemed New Orleans professor and writer Ken Holditch visits Demopolis for the Southern Literary Trail to talk about the food writings of Lillian Hellman and Tennessee Williams, both of whom he knew, in a classic southern setting at Lyon Hall. Holditch co-authored both “Dinner with Tennessee Williams” and “Galatoire’s, Biography of a Bistro” that includes recipes from the French Quarter restaurant. Holditch will speak about the literary legacy of Galatoire’s where he often shared the table with playwright and poet Tennessee Williams. Local partner for this program is the Marengo County Historical Society. The audience will be invited to stay for champagne after Dr. Holditch’s talk and to indulge in tastings of recipes from his books and from “Eating Together” by Lillian Hellman and Peter Feibleman. Click here for more info.

April 16: PASS THE FOLKLORE: FAMILY AND COMMUNITY TRADITIONS IN THE KITCHEN AND AROUND THE DINNER TABLE

Place: The Demopolis Public Library, 211 East Washington Street
Time: 6 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 334-289-1595

Alabama Humanities Foundation Road Scholar Joyce Cauthen will celebrate the traditions, besides food alone, that punctuate a Southern family’s table at the Demopolis Public Library. Trail writer Lillian Hellman said that her mother Julia Newhouse of Demopolis taught her “how to cook Alabama.” The famed writer’s final publication was a cookbook entitled “Eating Together.” Cauthen’s talk underscores the food and folklore of cooking Alabama. A champagne reception follows Cauthen’s program at the Library. Click here for more info.

April 18: AN EVENING WITH MISS RUBY

Place: Demopolis High School Auditorium
Times: 7 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call Dempolis High School at 334.289.0294

With respect for the storytellers and their tales, Ruby Pickens Tartt carefully collected the stories of African-Americans in her native Sumter County during the years spanning the Great Depression through World War II. She committed them to writing in Life Histories she composed for the Federal Writers’ Project, a branch of the W.P. A. created to provide employment for educators and scholars.

Tartt’s manuscripts encountered criticism by W.P.A. officials who did not understand her use of dialect and slang in her folklore writings. Some of her work was even destroyed by a tornado in 1945. It was the same year that three of Tartt’s short stories were published in the volume, “The Best American Short Stories of 1945,” a validation of her remarkable accomplishments and talents as a writer and a listener. Tartt’s stories will be brought to life on stage by her niece Jody Tartt, a Demopolis High School educator and frequent director for the Canebrake Players. This stage production is supported by a grant from the Alabama State Council for the Arts and presented as part of the Sucarnochee Folklife Festival. Click here for more info.

April 18: Streight’s Raid and The Making of a Confederate Heroine
Led by: Keith S. Hebert
This program is a part of the 2013 ArchiTreats: Food for Thought series designed to commemorate significant events in our state. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and to participate in an hour-long session on Alabama history.
At the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery
12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Grants project
[Click here for more information]

April 18-May 18: “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD” PERFORMED BY THE MOCKINGBIRD PLAYERS

Place: The Georgia-Pacific Amphitheater at the Old Courthouse Museum in Monroeville
Times and Ticket Info: Visit www.tokillamockingbird.com. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Sales begin on Friday, March 1, 2013, by walk-in at the Museum or by phone only.
Phone: 251-575-7433

The Mockingbird Players of Monroeville present the 23d season of their stage production of “To Kill A Mockingbird” from Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel. This season showcases the newly landscaped Georgia-Pacific amphitheater as a home for the popular play on the grounds of the Old Courthouse Museum in the heart of Monroeville, regarded as the model for Maycomb in the novel. During the famous trial scenes of “Mockingbird” when Atticus Finch defends falsely accused Tom Robinson, the drama moves into the actual courtroom where Lee’s father practiced law. Annually this production of “To Kill a Mockingbird” attracts audience members from around the world. Click here for more info.

April 19: The Life and the Art of Charlotte Salomon

Speaker: Dr. Donald Berry
Leeds High School in the High School Auditorium at 2 p.m.
Road Scholars

April 19: VIRGINIA DURR AND LILLIAN HELLMAN: TWO UNCOMPROMISING WOMEN AND THEIR ALABAMA FAMILIES

Place: The Alabama Department of Archives and History
Time: 12 Noon
Admission: Free
Info: Call 334.242.4435

The fight for racial equality defined Virginia Durr, the forthcoming subject of Lillian Hellman biographer Deborah Martinson (“Lillian Hellman, A Life with Foxes and Scoundrels”). Durr and Hellman were emotionally and culturally driven by experiences within their Alabama families. The title for the writer’s book about Durr says it all: “Virginia Durr: Southern Radical Come Hell or High Water.” Martinson discusses both these powerful women and the family experiences affecting their lives and igniting their activism during her talk at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Click here for more info.

April 20: THE ALABAMA BOOK FESTIVAL

Place: Old Alabama Town, 301 Columbus Street, Montgomery, Alabama
Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call 334.240.4500

The Southern Literary Trail and its tri-state organizers annually host a popular tent at the Alabama Book Festival in Montgomery’s historic Old Alabama Town. Free brochures and publications about the Trail, its literary landmarks and festivals will be shared under the tent. The Southern Literary Trail will also sponsor a remarkable discussion of Harper Lee’s campus journalism at the University of Alabama by the Alabama Readers Theatre. Click here for more info.

April 20: BEFORE “MOCKINGBIRD”: THE CAMPUS JOURNALISM OF HARPER LEE at The Alabama Book Festival

Place: Old Alabama Town, 301 Columbus Street, Montgomery, Alabama
Time: 4 p.m. in the Church of Old Alabama Town
Admission: Free
Info: Call 334.240.4500

Years befoe the publication of her groundbreaking “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Harper Lee fearlessly attacked the dictates of Jim Crow separatism as a student journalist at the University of Alabama. At the Alabama Book Festival, the Alabama Readers Theatre including Don Noble (APT’s “Bookmark”) and novelist Billy Cobb, a recipient of the Harper Lee Award, present Lee’s acerbic one act play from her student writings at the University’s campus newspaper “The Rammer Jammer.” It is entitled “Now Is The Time for All Good Men,” a satirical send-up of literacy tests at the voting booth and the bigoted politicians who supported them. Presented in collaboration with the Alabama Center for the Book. Click here for more info.

April 22: ALBERT MURRAY, PAPA JO JONES AND THE CREATION OF A JAZZ DRUMMER’S BIOGRAPHY

Place: Gulf City Lodge, 601 State St.
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call MOJO at 251-459-2298 or visit www.mojojazz.org

A jazz luminary, Alabama-born Papa Jo Jones dazzled his audiences with innovative drumming and a bigger-than-life personality. The intrigued included Mobile writer and music essayist Albert Murray. In 1977, Murray began to record his conversations with Jones, and their taped sessions continued for eight years. Murray collaborated with New York writer Paul Devlin to edit the conversations into a book, “Rifftide, The Life and Opinions of Papa Jo Jones.” The Southern Literary Trail partners with Mobile’s Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed (MOJO) to bring Devlin to Mobile for live playbacks of the taped conversations and for live jazz. Click here for more info.

April 23: THE EUGENE WALTER LECTURE BY JOHN T EDGE

Place: Oakleigh
Time: 7 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call the Preservation Society (Oakleigh) at 251-432-1281

In his popular Time-Life cookbook, “American Cooking: Southern Style,” Eugene Walter recalled the dining practices of his Mobile family: “Friday was fish day, and my grandfather would sometimes telephone that he had found good red snapper at the waterfront fish market, which would change all plans for the midday meal.” James Beard Award winner John T Edge of the Southern Foodways Alliance will inaugurate an annual Eugene Walter Lecture Series that examines Walter’s love of Southern foods and the South’s mealtime traditions. Presented with the Historic Mobile Preservation Society. Click here for more info.

April 24: ALBERT MURRAY, PAPA JO JONES AND THE CREATION OF A JAZZ DRUMMER’S BIOGRAPHY

Place: The Tuskegee University Archives and Museum
Time: 2 p.m.
Admission: Free
Info: Call the Archives at 334.727.8888

“Rifftide” editor and collaborator Paul Devlin brings the taped conversations between jazz drummer Papa Jo Jones and Tuskegee University alumnus Albert Murray to the campus for playbacks and discussion. He is joined by fellow Murray essayist Jay Lamar (“Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation”) for the event at the Tuskegee University Archives. Click here for more info.

April 25-27: “Lessons of the Birmingham Movement: A Symposium on Youth, Activism and the Struggle for Human Rights”

Birmingham Civil Rights Institute presents “Lessons of the Birmingham Movement: A Symposium on Youth, Activism and the Struggle for Human Rights.”
Top speakers : Juan Williams, Emmanuel Jal and Jose Vargas

  • Hear the stories of the veterans of the Birmingham Movement who participated in the 1963 Children’s March
  • Make the connection between current and historic human rights movements
  • Learn what activists are currently doing in Alabama
  • Come and experience the lessons of the movement through dramatic performances by local youth
  • Recognize young people who are making significant contributions to civil and human rights movements

Click here for more information about the symposium | Click here to register | This event is free to the public aside from a paid luncheon on Friday, April 26 Jose with Vargas.

April 25: AHF’s Young Professionals Board presents “What’s Your Legacy?: Impacting Our Communities 50 Years Later”
At the Carver Theater, downtown Birmingham

This program is designed to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Birmingham’s role in the Civil Rights Movement and encourage young people to reflect on the role and history of youth activism during the Civil Rights Movement. Young Professionals also hope to spark a call-to-action for youth leadership and civic engagement.

Attendees will view the documentary, The Black Power Mixtape, 1967-1975 – a film that provides a global perspective of the events of the Civil Rights Movement and how it impacted the development of the Black Power Movement in America. It also looks at the legacy of those activists and how contemporary Black artists are inspired by their message through film, music, and the arts. A panel discussion about the film will follow. Click here for more information about this event.

April 25-27: THE 16TH ANNUAL ALABAMA WRITERS SYMPOSIUM

Schedule includes discussion sessions, lectures, readings, workshops, receptions, luncheons and other events.
Featured Writers & Scholars: Rick Bragg, Gay Talese, Cassandra King, Chantel Acevedo, Marlin Barton, Kirk Curnutt, Anita Miller Garner, Peter Huggins, Nancy Dorman-Hickson, Jay Lamar, Lisa Graves Minor, Don Noble, Wendy Reed, Jeanie Thompson, Adam Vines, Sue Walker, Lila Quintero Weaver and Margaret Wrinkle
Featured Songwriter: Tom Kimmel
Featured Artist: Betty Kennedy
Harper Lee Award Winner for Alabama’s Distinguished Writer: Gay Talese
Eugene Current-Garcia Award Winner for Alabama’s Distinguished Literary Scholar: Sue Walker
Events take place on the campus of Alabama Southern Community College, at the Monroeville Community House and at the Old Courthouse Museum in downtown Monroeville.

Literary Alabama is distinguished by writers who weave stories like threads and fabrics into unique, colorful compositions. The Alabama Writers Symposium for 2013 features the theme of literary quilts: a patchwork of memoir, fiction and poetry. For two days, celebrated writers and book enthusiasts convene in the Alabama hometown of Harper Lee and Truman Capote. The Symposium is a project of the Alabama Center for Literary Arts and is sponsored by Alabama Southern Community College with support from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the City of Monroeville. Click here for Alabama Writers Symposium’s website, follow Alabama Writers Symposium on Facebook or click here to download the press kit.

April 26: River City Film Festival

Eugene Walter: Last of the Bohemians (2008) will be screened at the River City Film Festival at the Princess Theatre in Decatur on Friday, April 26 at 7 p.m.

April 28: “OUR MOCKINGBIRD,” A FILM BY SANDY JAFFE, PRESENTED BY THE BIRMINGHAM CHAPTER OF HADASSAH

Place: The Carver Theatre, 1631 4th Ave. North, Birmingham, Alabama
Time: 3 to 5 p.m.
Admission: Suggested Donation of $5.00
Info: Call the Carver at 205.254.2731

1963 proved to be pivotal for the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham: the year of the Children’s Crusade and a letter from the Birmingham jail by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. At 10:22 a.m. on September 15, 1963, a bomb exploded in the 16th Street Baptist Church. The lives of four innocent girls were cut short and a nation’s conscience was shaken. Decades later, two Birmingham area high schools – one black in Fairfield and the other white in Mountain Brook – collaborated on a theatrical version of “To Kill a Mockingbird” from Harper Lee’s novel of childhood innocence shattered by bigotry.

Filmmaker Sandy Jaffe filmed the students as they gathered for rehearsals and other events. Their story is woven through “Our Mockingbird” along with insights from teachers, lawyers, actors, and writers who weigh in on how this classic novel is a lens to look at race, class, gender, and justice – then and now. For the fiftieth anniversary of the 16th Street Baptist Church tragedy, the Birmingham Chapter of Hadassah presents “Our Mockingbird” with Sandy Jaffe as a special guest. She will be joined by a panel including some of the young actors from the Fairfield-Mountain Brook play. Supporters for the film include the Alabama Humanities Foundation. Click here for more info.

February 2013

February 5: Every Picture Tells a Story: The Storytelling of Norman Rockwell
Speaker: Dolores Hydock
Iris Garden Club, Lorna Rd (Hoover) at 11:30 am
Road Scholars

February 7: Fiddlers, Banjo Players and Strawbeaters – Alabama’s First Pop Musicians
Speaker: Joyce Cauthen
Bessemer Public Library, BessemerPublic Library(Bessemer, AL) at Noon
Road Scholars

February 7: Starch in Their Petticoats: True Stories of Strong Women Who Settled the West
Speaker:Dolores Hydock
Childersburg Ladies Book Club, First Baptist Church Childersburg (Childersburg) at 2:00 pm
Road Scholars

February 12: The Cultural Evolution of Alabama
Speaker: Bettina Byrd-Giles
American Assoc. of University Women – Birmingham, Cahaba Pumping Station (Birmingham) at 10:30 am
Road Scholars

February 27: Black History Month
Speaker: Richard Bailey
Adelia M. Russell Library, Adelia M. Russell Library – Main Floor (Alexander City) at 1:00 pm
Road Scholars

January 2013

January 12: At Home Between Home and Sky: Voices From Chandler Mountain
Speaker: Dolores Hydock
Dekalb County Library (Fort Payne) at 10:00 am
Road Scholars

January 16: Books: The History and Art of Letterpress Bookmaking
Speaker: Scott Fisk
New Horizons, Marshall Center – University of Alabama at Birmingham (Birmingham) at 9:30 am
Road Scholars

January 25: Alabama’s Own Nat King Cole
Speaker: Daphne Simpkins
Gulf Shores Museum, Adult Activity Center (Gulf Shores) at 10:00 am
Road Scholars

January 27: Prince Madoc and the Welsh Indians: A Persistent Frontier Myth in Alabama and Beyond
Speaker: Ronald Fritze
Butler County Historical and Genealogical Society, Greenville City Hall (Greenville) at 2:00 pm
Road Scholars

January 28: Starch in Their Petticoats: True Stories of Strong Women Who Settled the West
Speaker: Dolores Hydock
Indian Valley Women’s Club, Valleydale Baptist Church (Birmingham) at 10:30 am
Road Scholars

2012

December 2012

December 11: Selected Readings
Reading Series led by Nancy G. Anderson
Selma Dallas County Public Library (Selma) at 4:00 pm
Grants project

December 14: Alabama’s Own Nat King Cole
Speaker: Daphne Simpkins
Lafayette Pilot Public Library (Lafayette) at 12:00 noon
Road Scholars

December 14: The Cultural Evolution of Alabama
Speaker: Bettina Byrd-Giles
Leadership Baldwin County (Fairhope) at 1:00 pm
Road Scholars

December 20: “Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Alabama in the Civil War”
Speaker: Ben H. Severance
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives and History (Montgomery) at 12:00 noon
Grants project

November 2012

November 1: Deadline for AHF Mini Grants applications

November 11: The Art of War: Posters, Photographs and Postcards of World War I
Speaker: Marty Olliff, PhD
Tennessee Valley Museum of Art (Tuscumbia) at 1:00 p.m.
Road Scholars

November 13: The Namesake
Reading Series led by Jhumpa Lahiri
Selma Dallas County Public Library (Selma) at 4:00 pm
Grants project

November 15: “Lord Remember Me: Archiving Alabama’s Folklife”
Speaker: Kevin Nutt
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives and History (Montgomery) at 12:00 noon
Grants project

October 2012

October 25-26: AHF Board of Directors Board Meeting
The Marriott Shoals Hotel (Florence)

October 22: Alabama’s Own Nat King Cole
Speaker: Daphne Simpkins
Alex City Board of Education (Alexander City) at 1:30 p.m.
Road Scholars

October 18: “The Space Race in Alabama in the 1950’s and 1960’s”
Speaker: Andrew J. Dunar
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives and History (Montgomery) at 12:00 noon
Grants project

October 9: Let the Great World Spin
Reading Series led by Colum McCann
Selma Dallas County Public Library (Selma) at 4:00 pm
Grants project

October 5: Deadline for Whetstone/Seaman Faculty Development Award applications

October 4: School Spirits: Ghost Stories from Alabama’s College Campuses
Speaker: Alan Brown, PhD
Homewood Public Library (Homewood) at 6:30 p.m.
Road Scholars

September 2012

September 27: “The Iron Finger of Love”: The Journey of Clifton Taulbert from Mississippi’s Black Belt
Speaker: Nancy Anderson
Vestavia Methodist Church (Vestavia) at 12:00 noon
Road Scholars

September 22: “Yo Solo”
by New York-based Mena
Ticketed performance and panel discussion
Saenger Theatre (Mobile) at 7 p.m.
Grants project

September 20: “Sloths, Mammoths, and Saber-toothed Cats: The Ice Age Mammals of Alabama”
Speaker: Jun Ebersole
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives and History (Montgomery) at 12:00 noon
Grants project

September 11: Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter
Reading Series led by Tom Franklin
Selma Dallas County Public Library (Selma) at 4:00 pm
Grants project

September 10: Alabama Humanities Award luncheon
Speaker: E. O. Wilson
The Club (Birmingham)
10:30 a.m. Patrons and Jenice Riley scholarship reception
11:30 a.m. Luncheon

September 8: The Hernando de Soto Expedition: Exploration and Tragedy in 16th Century Alabama and the Southeast
Speaker: Ronald Fritz, PhD
Dekalb County Library (Fort Payne at 10:00 a.m.
Road Scholars

September 1: Deadline for AHF Major Grants applications

August 2012

August 30: The Rise and Fall of Atticus Finch
Speaker: Christopher Metress, PhD
Pelham Senior Center (Pelham) at 10:30 a.m.
Road Scholars

August 16: “The Rise and Decline of the Redneck Riviera”
Speaker: Hardy H. Jackson
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought
Alabama Department of Archives and History (Montgomery) at 12:00 noon
Grants project

August 10: AHF Board of Directors Planning Meeting
Montgomery Prattville Hotel & Conference Center at Capitol Hill (Prattville)

August 3: Jenice Riley Memorial Scholarship application deadline

August 1: Deadline for AHF Mini Grants applications

August 1 – September 15: “Alabama in the Making: Traditional Arts of People and Place”
Traveling exhibit featuring the traditional arts of five regions in the state with contextual information.
River Canyon Center (Fort Payne)
Grants project

July 2012

July 22 – September 14: “Both Sides of the Lens: Photographs by the Shackelford Family, Fayette County, Alabama (1910-1935)”
Exhibition – Photographs taken by a family of African-American photographers who lived in Covin, Alabama, the images reveal the lives of the photographers as well as those being photographed.
Birmingham Public Library (Birmingham)
Grants project

To commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, the Alabama Humanities Foundation partnered with the public libraries in Birmingham, Huntsville, Mobile and Montgomery to host the “Let’s Talk about It: Making Sense of the American Civil War” reading and discussion series.

Each of the libraries hosted a free, five-part reading and discussion series led by expert scholars affiliated with colleges or universities in each city.

Session attendees read the following texts provide by the NEH:

  • March, by Geraldine Brooks (Penguin, 2006)
  • Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam, by James McPherson (Oxford University Press, 2002)
  • America’s War: Talking about the Civil War and Emancipation on Their 150th Anniversaries: an anthology of historical fiction, speeches, diaries, memoirs, biography, and short stories, edited by national project scholar Edward L. Ayers and co-published by NEH and ALA.

“Let’s Talk About It: Making Sense of the American Civil War” was made possible by the Alabama Humanities Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association.

2011

November 2011

November 5
The Great Depression in Alabama Photographs
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Frances Robb
Anniston-Calhoun County Public Library
Sponsored by the AlaBenton Genealogical Society
1:00 p.m.
Lou Walker: (256) 362-8319
AHF program

November 10
Journey Stories: Perry County Pathways
Civil Rights Activities in Perry County (A Live Oral History Event)
Dr. Billie Jean Young, Moderator, artist-in-residence, Judson College
Judson College (Marion) Ramsay-McCrummen Chapel
10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Grants project

November 14
Dead Cats & Spunk Water: Superstitions & Strange Logic in the Writings of Mark Twain
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Dolores Hydock
Asbury United Methodist Church (Birmingham)
Sponsored by the Young at Heart of Asbury UMC
6:30 p.m.
Bill Ayers: (295) 980-0348
AHF program

November 15
Scott and Zelda in the Heart of Dixie
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Richard Anderson
Eufaula Carnegie Library
Sponsored by Eufaula Carnegie Library
6:30 p.m.
Ronnie Smith: (334) 687-8190
AHF program

October 2011

October 11
Morrison and Twain: The Black and White of It
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Elaine Hughes
Cahaba Pumping Station Museum (Mountain Brook)
Sponsored by the American Association of University Women
10:30 a.m.
Patti Steelman: (205) 967-6322
AHF program

October 17
School Spirits: Ghost Stories of Alabama’s College Campuses
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Alan Brown
Alexander City Board of Education
Sponsored by Horizons Unlimited
1:30 p.m.
Ellen Martin: (256) 234-8661
AHF program

October 18
School Spirits: Ghost Stories of Alabama’s College Campuses
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Alan Brown
Armstrong-Osborne Public Library (Talladega)
Sponsored by: Armstrong-Osborne Public Library
12 p.m.
Vickie Harkins: (256) 362-4211
AHF program

October 19
Journey Stories: Perry County Pathways
The Longest Journey: Twelve Thousand Years of Native American Migration and Travel
Guest lecturer Dr. Ashley A. Dumas, assistant professor of anthropology, The University of West AlabamaJudson College (Marion) Ramsay-McCrummen Chapel
4-5:00 p.m.
Grants project

October 23
Spare Time, Leisure and Recreation in Alabama
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Frances Robb
Huntsville Museum of Art
Sponsored by the Huntsville Museum of Art
2:00 p.m.
Deborah S. Taylor: (256) 535-4350 ext. 217
AHF program

October 23
“Whispers From The Past”
Come see a collection of artifacts from UAB’s Josselyn collection and speak with an anthropologist about Alabama Native Americans. KId’s activities will include : ancient weaponry and games, tattoos, clay pot construction, cooking demo (like Alabama’s early Native Americans), weaving and identifying medicinal plants throughout the garden. Scholars will lead adults/teachers on walking tours of the gardens viewing medicinal plants used by Alabama’s Native Americans.
Aldridge Gardens (Hoover)
1-5 p.m.
More information: www.aldridgegardens.com
Grants project

October 24
Will Rogers: An American Original
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Daphne Simpkins
Alexander City Board of Education
Sponsored by Alexander City Board of Education
1:30 p.m.
Lou Ann Wagoner: (256) 234-8600
AHF program

October 27
School Spirits: Ghost Stories from Alabama’s College Campuses
An Alabama Humanities Foundation Roads Scholar Speakers Bureau presentation with Alan Brown
Bessemer Public Library
Sponsored by Bessemer Public Library
4:00 p.m.
Dianne Clark: (205) 986-7744
AHF program