2016 SUPER Teacher Institutes and Workshops

SUPER Teacher programs are shaping up for 2016, and teachers across Alabama are encouraged to get involved in these free institutes and workshops that enhance the classroom experience for teachers and students alike.

The schedule is:

Español o Castellano?: History of the Spanish Language (Language Immersion Program)

June 6 – 10, 2016
Five-day Residential Institute
University of Montevallo,  Montevallo, AL
Lead Scholar: Leonor Vazques-Gonzales, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish, University of Montevallo

Program Description
Español o Castellano?:  History of the Spanish Language will provide a comprehensive overview of the history of the Spanish language with an emphasis on the rise and development of Castilian, and its diffusion and transformations beyond the Iberian Peninsula.  This institute includes the linguistic development of the Spanish language from its Latin roots to Modern Spanish. Participants will study the sociocultural, historical and literary factors that have affected the linguistic evolution of the Spanish language.

This program will be particularly helpful to Spanish teachers who are interested in broadening their knowledge of the Spanish language and language change.  This program will include discussions about the differences among dialects in the Hispanic world. This is a language immersion institute; participants are required to have speaking and reading knowledge of the Spanish language.


Residential institute; housing and meals provided. Required reading provided in advance of institute.
CEUs Awarded: 40
Educational expense allowance provided.

Click here to apply!

World War II in Alabama and Beyond

June 13 – 16, 2016
Four-day Residential Institute
University of Mobile, Mobile, AL
Lead Scholar: Matthew L. Downs, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History, University of Mobile
Co-Lead Scholars: Lonnie Burnett, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Professor of History, University of Mobile and Michael D. Robinson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History, University of Mobile

Program Description
World War II was a transformational event in the history of the United States, changing the way that Americans viewed their government, their economic system, society, and their role in the world. This institute will encourage participating teachers to see the war as a transformational event in the lives of Americans, and Alabamians in particular. It will also help teachers find resources, gain new insights, and strategize ways to present the war to students at a variety of educational levels.

Participants will spend four days in residence at the University of Mobile, located just north of Mobile, Alabama. University history faculty, led by Dr. Matthew L. Downs, will discuss Alabama’s war at home and abroad, and help participants think more broadly about the changes that impacted the state and nation. Dr. Dan Puckett of Troy University will discuss his work on Alabama’s Jewish residents during the war, and particularly their experience in the Holocaust. Mr. John Sledge, an accomplished author, will speak with participants about his father, Eugene Sledge, one of the most celebrated memoirists of the wartime combat experience. Mr. Kevin Rawls, who teaches history at Satsuma High School, will lead a session helping participants conceive of and integrate activities on World War II in the classroom.

In addition to sessions at the University of Mobile, participants will travel off campus to two important World War II museums. Participants will tour the USS Alabama, permanently docked on Mobile Bay, and learn about the battleship’s wartime experience. Participants will also travel to New Orleans to visit the National World War II Museum, which has been recently remodeled to provide an immersive and moving experience. Taken as a whole, the program will provide participants with the knowledge, tools, and skills to introduce students to the profound importance of the American experience of World War II.

Residential institute; housing and meals provided. Required reading provided in advance of institute.
CEUs Awarded: 36.5
Educational expense allowance provided.

Click here to apply!

Stony the Road We Trod: Alabama's Role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement - NEH Workshop

June 26 – July 2, 2016 and July 10 – 16, 2016
Seven-day Residential Institute
Birmingham, AL
Project Director: Martha Bouyer, DMIN, Executive Director of the Historic Bethel Baptist Church
Lead Scholar: Glenn Eskew, Professor of History, Georgia State University

Program Description

The “Stony . . .” Workshop offers a unique opportunity for educators to participate in an in-depth, one-week, interactive field study of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and the pivotal role that Alabama played in making the promises of the U.S Constitution a greater reality for more Americans.  Teachers will trace the role of protest in American history as a tool used to obtain civil liberties and civil rights by examining Alabama’s pivotal role in the Modern Civil Rights Movement. Birmingham will serve as the host city for this series of workshops which include travel to Selma, Montgomery, and Tuskegee – all key “battleground” sites in the struggle for civil rights.

Benefits include:

  • Stimulating readings and discussions with university scholars, guest speakers, and peers
  • Explore and create practical applications for your classroom using humanities content
  • A $1,200 stipend to offset travel, lodging, and study expenses
  • Travel to key sites dedicated to the preservation of civil rights history

For a full description and program application, please visit www.stonytheroad.org. This project is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, and applications requirements are specific to NEH Guidelines. The application deadline for this program is March 1, 2016. 

 

Maycomb Moments, 1930s and 1950s: Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman

July 17 – 22, 2016
Five-day Residential Institute
Alabama Southern Community College, Monroeville, AL
Lead Scholar: Nancy Grisham Anderson, Associate Professor of English  and Distinguished Outreach Fellow at Auburn Montgomery

Program Description

Significant events in 2015 and 2016, especially the publication of Go Set a Watchman and the death of Nelle Harper Lee, invite a reconsideration of her writings and her legacy.  Where better to pursue this study than in Lee’s hometown, Monroeville, Alabama, the inspiration for the fictional Maycomb? Participants will discuss relevant history, family reminiscences, biographies (myths and realities), the novels and the short publications, the movie of TKAM, and music inspired by TKAM, and will share personal experiences of teaching Lee’s writings. Participants in the earlier SUPER teacher institutes entitled “Mockingbird Moments” may apply.

Residential institute; housing and meals provided. Required reading provided in advance of institute.
CEUs Awarded: 40
Educational expense allowance provided.

Click here to apply!