2014 SUPER Institutes & Workshops

Applications will be accepted until all slots are filled.  Click here to apply.

Paris' New Cultural Spaces: French Immersion Workshop

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Thursday, June 19, 2014
One-day Workshop
Language Immersion Institute – French
Location: University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB)
Lead Scholar: Catherine Danielou, Ph.D., Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, UAB College of Arts & Sciences
Institutional Partners: UAB College of Arts & Sciences
This workshop will examine how new Parisian cultural spaces such as the Musée du Quai Branly and the Galliera Musée de la Mode, repurposed districts, new parks, newly created espaces jeunes, new public institutions, and recent bridges such as Pont Charles-de-Gaulle and Passerelle Simone-de-Beauvoir have redefined and restructured the city of Paris. The workshop will feature literary readings and a discussion on the role of cultural spaces in Paris. It will integrate digital resources and media, language-immersion instruction, and resources that can be used in the classroom. Full immersion in French.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.

American Slave Narratives: Their Impact on Fiction and Film

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June 23-26, 2014
Four-day Residential Institute
Location: The University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa)
Lead Scholar: Alan Brown, Ph.D., Professor of Languages and Literature at University of West Alabama
Institution Partners: The University of Alabama and University of West Alabama
Slave narratives are one of the most riveting types of autobiographical writing ever produced in America. They range from the published slave narratives penned in the century by writers like Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs to the less formal 19th slave narratives collected in the American South by the W.P.A. between 1936 and 1938. Although their validity has been questioned by historians for years, they put a face on slavery, thereby making these stories meaningful for today’s students. The twentieth century produced a number of novels and films that constitute fictional accounts of the slave experience in America. “American Slave Narratives” will study the autobiographical form of the American slave narrative, and trace the evolution in American history to the narrative form in the American novel and the American cinema.
Residential institute; housing and meals provided. CEUs provided.

Battle of Mobile Bay

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Battle of Mobile Bay

Tuesday, July 8, 2014
One-day Workshop
Location: History Museum of Mobile
Lead Scholar: Dr. Lonnie Burnett, Professor of History at University of Mobile
Institutional Partners: History Museum of Mobile & University of Mobile
This one-day workshop will engage teachers in the history and commemoration of the Battle of Mobile Bay. Educators will receive resources and implementation strategies to integrate this vital piece of Alabama history into their social science curriculum.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.

The History, Literature and Music of WWI

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The History, Literature and Music of WWI

Thursday, July 10, 2014
One-day Workshop
Location: History Museum of Mobile
Lead Scholar: Marty Olliff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History & Archivist at Troy University Dothan Campus
Institutional Partners: Alabama Department of Archives and History, Troy University & History Museum of Mobile
This one-day workshop is designed to introduce teachers to the history and literature of World War I. Topics include Alabama doughboys of the 167th Regiment, the war on the Eastern Front, the African American experience on the home front and American literature from the war. The workshop will provide teachers with historical and cultural resources, curriculum integration strategies and techniques, digital media resources, and valuable literature to share with their students across the humanities disciplines.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.

Mockingbird Moments

Screen shot 2014-03-26 at 4.08.10 PMMockingbird Moments: To Kill a Mockingbird (Novel and Film) in Harper Lee’s Hometown, Monroeville, Alabama

July 14-17, 2014
Four-day Residential Institute
Location: Monroeville, AL
Lead Scholar: Nancy Grisham Anderson, Associate Professor of English at Auburn University at Montgomery
Institution Partners: Monroe County Museum, AL Southern Community College, Auburn University at Montgomery
Harper Lee has described To Kill a Mockingbird as a “love story” of small-town life, a way of life now rapidly disappearing in our country. “Mockingbird Moments” provides teachers the opportunity to experience small-town life in the author’s hometown, Monroeville, Alabama. In the town that inspired the successful novel and subsequent movie, they will discuss the novel as literature, study the history of the 1930s and the 1960s, visit the museum and archives devoted to the novel and the town of its origin, meet residents who shared early years with the author, watch the film in the courtroom recreated in the film, and listen to music inspired by the novel. Teachers will gain a more in-depth understanding of the novel and film and their significance in our culture through their studies and their immersion in small-town life.
Residential institute; housing and meals provided. CEUs provided.

Social Movements in Latin America: Exclusion, Popular Protests, and Democratization


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Social Movements in Latin America: Exclusion, Popular Protests, and Democratization

July 28-31, 2014
Four-day Residential Institute
Location: University of Montevallo
Language Immersion Institute – Spanish
Lead Scholar: Leonor Vazquez-Gonzalez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Spanish at University of Montevallo
Institutional Partners: University of Montevallo
Social and substantive citizenship in Latin America has traditionally been a highly exclusionary status; this situation has worsened as a result of the negative dimensions of current globalization, in particular, economic crises, political corruption and transnational organized crime. However, from a positive vantage point, globalization has opened novel political spaces in which patterns of relations between state and civil society are glimpsed. This institute examines a series of contemporary social movements in Latin America whose common denominator is the attempt to break down old and new systems of domination in order to create a more inclusionary and empowered society. Participants will explore the origins, ideas, successes and failures of a variety of popular movements such as urban, labor, indigenous, gender and environmental movements.
Residential institute; housing and meals provided. CEUs provided.

Team-Based & Collaborative Learning in Digital Environments for the Humanities


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Team-Based & Collaborative Learning in Digital Environments for the Humanities

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
One-day Workshop
Location: University of Alabama at Birmingham
Lead Scholar: Rosie O’Beirne, Director of Digital Media & Learning at UAB
Institutional Partners: UAB College of Arts and Sciences and UAB Digital Media
This workshop will engage teachers across the humanities by providing teachers with a number of resources and techniques that will allow them to integrate multimedia and digital technologies with student learning and instruction. Teachers will collaborate in a state of the art media classroom, equipped with Apple products that are loaded with the latest media applications and collaborative learning stations.
Non-residential workshop; breakfast snacks and lunch provided. CEUs provided.

Applications will be accepted until all slots are filledClick here to apply.

To complete your application, you must submit:

  • A  short essay about this topic: How will attending this institute benefit you as an educator? How do you foresee applying the experience and knowledge you expect to gain from this institute in your classroom?
Essay response must be typed, double-spaced, one page in length. (Handwritten application essays will not be accepted). Include at the top of the page your name, address and the institute to which you are applying. Your reply will be a major determining factor for admission.
  • $50 refundable deposit

Please email your essay to Dionne Clark at dclark@alabamahumanities.org.
And mail your  $50 refundable deposit to:

SUPER Teacher Program
Alabama Humanities Foundation
1100 Ireland Way, Suite 202
Birmingham, AL 35205

If you have any questions, please contact Dionne Clark by phone: (205) 558-3999 or email dclark@alabamahumanities.org.